Friday Mess-o-links

Let’s dig right in with some stuff I’ve collected this week.

If you’re seeing all these scary stories about the cattle dying from heat stress, please know that it’s not quite the big deal it sounds like. It’s not great, but it’s pretty normal, according to Ann Barnhardt. Bill Gates would still like to starve you into submission, though. You want to keep an eye on his kind.

Farming isn’t looking too good right now. Pray, plant as much as you can, and pray some more:

The Price of Gas and Friend/Enemy Distinction. Read that whole thing. Jesus said to love your enemies. That means that you are going to have some. You’d better be able to discern who they are. Fortunately, these days they make themselves obvious.

Consumer Groups Step Up Pressure on Lowe’s, Home Depot to Stop Selling Cancer-Causing Weedkiller I think it would be a good idea for everybody reading this to call their local Lowes or Home Depot, and all other sellers of Round-up, and tell them you won’t shop with them until they remove the poison from their shelves. We might also politely remind them that they could be sued along with the manufacturers for selling environmental toxins. I do plan to make that phone call myself.

Equal protection under the law is a thing of the past. Know your enemies, and know what power they hold, and where they hold that power. I wouldn’t set foot on federal property for the world right now. Simone Gold to be sentenced for walking into the Capitol building and reading a prepared speech on January 6th.

Along the same lines, this will not be used even-handedly or in a measured way:

Words from Jefferson Smith, Confederate Soldier, North Carolinian, prophet:

And finally, some good advice for women facing c-sections from SG moms with c-section experience. I’ll just grab some of my own thoughts from GAH 1.0, back in the c-section-having days to go along with that.

We’re back into the swing of things after a few weeks of having and then getting to know our new baby:

She’s in good health, and so am I. My doctor said she has me down in her book as the “fastest c-section recovery ever”. Guess that makes me some kind of winner. Where’s the prize for that? I’ve been told it’s because I “must be one tough lady”, and maybe that’s part of it, but it’s even more because I’m too restless and distracted to lie around and recover in a more leisurely, sedate fashion. Never did know how to behave myself. (Added 6/17/22: Also, every surgery is a little bit easier to recover from because the incision area becomes numb, though still itchy. That’s not super. It’s irritating and a little bit scary.)

C-section tip: Try getting up and moving around, sitting in a chair instead of the bed to eat those abysmal hospital meals, showering, changing the baby’s diapers, etc., as soon as you recover feeling in your legs. You get better faster if you just face the pain and get it over with. Besides, the morphine they give with the spinal wears off after 24 hours, and if you wait that long to get up, it will hurt more the first time you move, not less. Don’t overdo it, though. Rest as much as you can between all the self- and baby-care.
The surgery itself: I don’t want to scare anybody, so I’ll say the reassuring part first: Most c-sections are completely painless, just weird, so don’t be afraid! My first three were textbook, perfect, no pain. But! Did you know that sometimes the spinal doesn’t numb you as far up your body as necessary? I was sure they were trying to stuff the baby into my chest toward the end there. Perhaps they were using my spleen as a stress-ball. Sure felt like it. I would have preferred any amount of labor pain over that experience.

The baby was well worth it, of course. Her siblings are over the moon for her, and Get Along Husband and I have to fight the kids for our turn to hold her.

Speaking of childbirth, it has been very hard for me to let go of that phase of my life. After the fifth c-section, there just wasn’t a lot of uterus left to hold any more babies, and I’ve mourned my inability to have any more children the way a warrior might mourn his glory days on the battlefield. While I was searching for that old post, I found this post that I’d written to a woman who questioned the wisdom of my multiple c-sections. Still worth sharing, I think:

While I’m extremely uncomfortable with the idea that children are a choice to be made, rather than a gift to be received, I am equally uncomfortable with the idea that women’s lives are fully expendable in the service of procreation. Not every risk we can take is an honorable one. Sometimes it may be foolhardy or even heartless, depending on the circumstances.

In speaking with my husband about it last week, I likened the situation to that of a soldier. A woman’s valor in childbirth is certainly comparable to that of a soldier in battle, and her necessity to the survival of her people is just as clear. The potential for grief is great. Childbirth is scary, painful, messy, smelly, bloody and dangerous. There is often cursing and violence involved. It is also good and necessary. We’d think very poorly indeed of an able-bodied young man who was needed to defend his nation from an enemy, but who refused to do so.

At some point, depending on the health and circumstances of the woman, she can certainly become wounded and unable to return to the battlefield, just as a wounded soldier can. Sure, even a crippled soldier could probably hobble back out there with just half of one leg and one eye, and many would be glad to do so if they could. But not only would our wounded soldier be unlikely to do any good for his cause, he’d be a liability to the other men who’d have to cover and care for him. So we salute his valor, honor his sacrifice, and keep him out of the fighting from now on. We revere him as a hero, despite his inability to continue. This is true whether he was wounded in his first battle or his twentieth.


Likewise, I could (and want to!) get right back into the “battle” and try making a new baby. But if my uterus is extremely thin (or some other complication arises), trying to have more children would probably result not only in my or the baby’s death or disability, but in the rest of the family suffering for it, too. I trust God in all things, including pregnancy. I also trust my doctor and the understanding God gave him to help me figure out when my body is failing.

 

As for my own impending c-section, I still have no idea how things are going to turn out. I am praying and preparing for a good birth, good news about the condition of my uterus, and the all-clear to go back into battle if the Lord sees fit. Given the risk of hysterectomy, thinning, and placenta problems with each subsequent c-section, I am also trying (with limited success) to emotionally prepare myself for the bad news that my child-bearing days are over.

Fortunately, the Lord saw fit to give us one more child even after that one, and then in the last c-section, my doctor said to me “Cindy, your uterus has just lost all its integrity! I can’t make this safe for another baby.” And so we had my tubes tied, and I’ve cried about it every month since. It is not easy to be discharged from service, even honorably.

Anyhow, deep breath. That’s all I’ve got right now. What’s interesting in your neck of the woods? Links to your own blog posts or social media finds in the comments, please!

 

 

 

Food, Food Everywhere

And not a bite to eat.

We’ve been attending a new church lately, and we’re really feeling like we’ve finally found a home. One thing I’ve found about Christians is that they’re pretty lovable, so it’s not too hard to jump right in and get to know them. There is a little bit of awkwardness because of the differences in how we live out our faith as compared to the vast majority of Christians. Nobody condemns us, of course. Quite the contrary: while they don’t join us in our convictions, they often (claim to) admire them. I feel like if they really admired the differences, they’d adopt them. But at least they’re willing to step inside our worldview long enough to relate to it. I can content myself with that.

But explanations must occasionally be made. Where many are content, or feel they are forced by circumstance, to send their children to public schools, we think that Christians are called to protect their children from Godless indoctrination, whatever the cost. While I cover my head in worship (but never my face), most regard that act as outdated and legalistic. Unlike practically every evangelical Christian in the South, we don’t believe that it is a sin, or even unwise, to drink wine at appropriate times. These last few years, I’ve had to add one more thing to the ever-growing pile of differences to be navigated in a group setting: food.

Y’all know what church food is like. It’s the Standard American Diet, but with more of everything that is wrong with it. More sugar, more flour, more seed oil, more “love” in every bite. Also, more heart disease, diabetes, and cancer in every body. I know this can’t please God, and I can’t get comfortable with it.

Of course, most churches don’t meet for a meal every single day, or even every week, so excepting my own very restricted diet and a few serious allergens that must be avoided, a meal once in a while that includes a lot of refined carbohydrates or seed oils should be something the kids can just skate past with little difficulty. But I don’t want them to learn to take poor nutrition as a fact of religious life. It just rubs me the wrong way to make egregious exceptions for the sake of fellowship. I try my best to guide the children in eating what is advantageous to their bodies, and politely declining the rest, while hopefully managing not to take ourselves too far outside the group’s comfort zone. We often don’t even have to mention it, but can just pick and choose from the available items.

But sometimes we do appear extreme. We have a gluten problem for one of my children that makes any amount of wheat beyond that found in a communion cracker a health and behavioral nightmare. I trust that eating that will not harm the child because of the nature of the Sacrament. I don’t honestly think any human digests wheat or any other grain as well as they think they do, so I keep it out of all of our diets. I very much appreciate when there are gluten-free options at the table for our family. This church has gone above and beyond to try to make our family comfortable in this and other ways.

Our family’s food culture is so different that we can’t impose our needs on the whole group. It’s funny to me. The way we eat is much simpler, from buying, to cooking, to clean-up. It’s basically a lot of meat and some fruit, with a few of what I think of as the gentler vegetables for variety. Plain fare like this should be less of a logistical problem than all of these complicated casseroles and desserts, but people just don’t want to eat that way. They want bread. They want the kinds of hyper-palatable messes I used to make in the kitchen. I can’t blame them for wanting to eat what they’ve always eaten. That stuff tastes like love, doesn’t it? But it’s not love. It’s not even food, half the time.

I can’t blame them. Nor can I join them in it on anything like a regular basis. To keep our food healthful, while still enjoying the fellowship of others, here’s what we’ve become accustomed to doing for any church or family function that includes a meal:

Eat before you go. How much you eat beforehand depends very much on the menu where you’re going. I can eat the main things at a cookout, but there’s never an acceptable dish at a covered-dish dinner. I don’t want to eat more than my expected share of the real food, either, so I still need to be not-too-hungry even when there are meat-only options. Real food does cost more. That’s part of why is it so hard to make inroads into the way people think about food. Most of the Christians I know, including myself, don’t have a lot of money to throw around. The best way around this discomfort is to be no hungrier when you go than you need to be to enjoy a little bit of the repast. I often make these protein shakes for the kids before we go so they don’t feel deprived with a lighter plate later.

Bring a dish to share. Even if it’s fully catered, nobody is going to mind if you plop down a dish or two of whatever you’re having.

Bring your own snack stuff. If I’m not able to make a dish for everyone to share, I will as discretely as possible pull my stash of meat sticks and cheese out of my purse to dole out to the kids when they find their plates a little light.

Fast and enjoy the company. You don’t have to eat, you know. Just grab a cup of coffee or water and sit down to chat. People will notice you’re not eating and ask if you want to get a plate. Practically nothing embarrasses me, so I’m taking other people’s word for it that this is uncomfortable. I just say “No thanks, I already ate.” or something like that. You don’t have to explain your crazy diet to everybody, and they’d probably rather not hear about it anyway.

Here’s what’s hard about all this, and it causes me to compromise occasionally: it makes people feel inadequate when they can’t feed you. They want to share, and you won’t let them. It’s alienating. I don’t ever want people to feel that way! So I do sometimes bend the rules and allow the kids to eat gluten-free breads and pastas where I wouldn’t dream of doing so in our home. They sometimes get to eat some candy I wouldn’t allow as a rule. As we get to know people better, they do get more comfortable with our weirdness, so the compromises aren’t habitual or permanent. Sometimes we just have to take the hit for the sake of fellowship.

We don’t eat this way to be separate or to keep ourselves above the cultural milieu, but because I truly believe it results in the very best health a person can achieve in this sick world. Ultimately, I’d like our family’s healthy way of eating to rub off on the community around us. I’d like to see everybody in my community as vigorously healthy as possible, so that they may serve the Lord even more effectively than they already do. I can’t help them with that while indulging in cake and spaghetti, so I do believe that any compromises should be strategic and short-term.

Thus far, people seem happy to allow for our quirks, but hardly anyone ever joins us in them. I’m not by nature a patient person, but I know it’s a long game we’re playing. You can’t change a culture before it’s ready to change. All you can really do is be a light to those can be made to see, while trying not to mind that the darkness doesn’t comprehend. This is as true of nutrition as it is of any other aspect of culture.

How about you? Do you have any tips for navigating a dangerous dietary landscape without making a fuss?

(None of my links are affiliate links unless otherwise noted. I usually just link to products because I like them.)

Friday Randomness

Or should that be “Random Mess”? It’s been a whole month since I wrote anything! I’m very sorry, and I feel sure that the summer vacation will be better. Three days left in our school year. Grinding it out!

I love my toes.

I’ve been wearing the Vibram five-finger shoes for a few weeks. At first I just walked around the house in them. Then when I felt good about my foot-strength I started working out in them. They’re really fun to wear. It’s not a hard transition if you go around barefoot most of the time, as I do at home. While doing some one-arm, one-leg planks, I noticed that my balance is much better when my toesies can wiggle. They were just waving around having a fine old time, rediscovering themselves, and it made my core steadier than ever! I really had no idea how useful my toes were until I let them express their individuality. Now to upgrade my running shoes.

Truth Social

What’s the first thing President Donald J. Trump does when I finally decide to sign up for his lame-o social media platform? Why, try and make me love him again, of course!:

Yeah, I’m not falling for the Elon thing. I also hate Republicans. But I’m not falling for you again, either, Mr. President. Fail me once, shame on you. Fail me twice? Yeah. No.

You can follow me there, but I don’t know if I’ll use it. I just thought it was a good idea to squat on my username so nobody else can impersonate me. Who knows? I might find a use for it. It’s very Twitter-esque in its design, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. UPDATE: Never mind. I deleted it. It was lame, alright.

Ready to submit to the World Health Organization, global citizen?

Dozens of governments, including our own, are poised to sign a “treaty” that gives power within their nations to the WHO, primarily funded by Bill Gates, to declare and manage pandemics. This does not, of course, give legitimate authority to the WHO, but they’ll be behaving as if it did. So will some of your NPC pastors who say things like “Christians obey! It’s who we are!”

Hope you’re ready to make a very costly stand, because the forced vaccinations and masks and all of it will be back.

Oh, look! Here’s 13 million plandemic-ready monkeypox vaccines for a heretofore unheard-of and apparently nonlife-threatening disease that’s suddenly popping up among…um…gay men. Probably triple-vaxxed and boosted gay men. Those are the most heavily compromised immune systems in the universe. Relax, normie. You will not get monkeypox. I know you, though. You’re going to put on the mask anyway to show how much you care, aren’t you?

And the first went, and poured out his vial upon the earth; and there fell a noisome and grievous sore upon the men which had the mark of the beast, and upon them which worshipped his image. –Revelation 16:2

Thomas Insel (not incel) makes the case for abolishing psychiatry. Having had some brushes with the trade myself in my life before Jesus, I can only say:

They’ll make voters out of every “refugee”. But don’t you dare object to the undermining of your nation. That’s not neighborly.

10 states report severe hepatitis in children as researchers investigate mysterious outbreak.

It’s happening everywhere. One of my children had a mystery hepatitis after a round of routine childhood vaccinations. Doctors wouldn’t say it was the vaccines. They probably really believed it couldn’t be the vaccines. But it was the vaccines. How often does a vaccine of any kind wreak this kind of havoc in a child, but people are only now linking the disparate cases? It’s untellin‘, as the old folks liked to say (and I do, too).

I’m currently reading:

Fully covid!vaxxed gorilla dies of multiple organ failure. Happened to some giraffes, too, if I recall correctly. Of course, that’s all debunked by mockingbird media, so roll up your sleeves, little kids! The FDA says it’s fine!

Steve Kirsch, who stands to lose everything for saying so, says otherwise:

…the government has not provided you with the key data you need to make a proper risk-benefit assessment. They have assumed that the vaccines haven’t caused a single death. That simply isn’t true and you can now prove that yourself, just like I did recently using adult death data which included vaccination status. The result is highly statistically significant and has not been disputed. I’ve made the data publicly available.

As somebody who likes to lift weights, and run, and just generally crush everything in sight, this post by some soyboy made me laugh. As if all those lines memorized from The Princess Bride were of any use to anybody. Think I’ll keep grunting, lifting, eating meat, and being brilliant.

I admit, though, that for a couple of hours after a really intense workout, I seem to temporarily lose a few IQ points. Maybe 20. I think it’s the muscles hogging all the glucose. Even in that condition, I’m still smarter than this guy.

That about clears my tabs for the day. Hope you have a very happy Friday and a restful weekend, friends!

Comments should be open, if you want to talk back. I love it when people talk back.

Friday Link-About

All health and fitness stuff today, because those are the tabs I have open. Links are not affiliate links.

Plastic-hunting. I’ve been reading Estrogeneration, by Anthony Jay. It is the stuff of nightmares, what has happened to our society because of the plasticization of everything. I had (mostly thanks to this guy) been aware of the problems of birth control, plastics, and estrogenic agricultural chemicals for some time, so I’d already eliminated the obvious food culprits: soy and flax, food that isn’t organically grown (to the extent possible), and plastic storage and cooking utensils, including anything with a so-called non-stick surface. I’ve also been super-careful about our cosmetics and personal care products. Anthony G. Jay also does DNA analysis and has a wealth of information at his website, A. J. Consulting. I find his list of clean products particularly helpful.

I have seriously been slacking in the area of drinks, though. We drink water out of plastic bottles when we’re on the go, and I still make coffee in the most common of electric coffee-makers with plastic tubing and parts. I felt yucky about this, but hadn’t gotten motivated to fix it yet. Today, I finally bit the bullet and took a couple of extra steps to get the plastics out of our drinks. I’ve ordered a stainless steel percolator for coffee. The first one I looked at turned out to have an aluminum nut in contact with the coffee. I’m not going to exchange plastic for aluminum, so I finally found this one, which might possibly be actually SS. I hope so, because I don’t want to have to return it. (Update, it was an aluminum nut on the bottom, so I returned it. Glass pour-over it is. My lazy self will just have to add the water manually from now on. First-world problems, indeed!)

And I also picked up some glass water bottles. I’ve already done the glass water bottles in the past, and they worked pretty well, but…well, they break. I’m hoping we can be more careful this time around. Might have been better to go with stainless steel, since we’re prone to breaking things, but I feel like water tastes better in glass.

Healthy doggie. I’ve also ordered some much healthier dog food for my pupper. He eats mostly meat, and mostly right from our table, but sometimes there’s not enough meat left over, so I supplement him with the least unhealthy dog food I can find. That means I try to keep beans and legumes, as well as grains, out of his diet. Yumwoof is so far the best dog food I’ve found that isn’t straight up raw meat, which my dog hates. Expensive, but we don’t give our dog that much kibble, so it should last a while. You and I can both get $20 off our next orders if you hit that link.

And another Mother’s Day gift idea, if you’re still shopping, and the mother in your life is into fitness. (Are you reading this, Get Along Fam?) Egg Weights is offering a limited “Active All Spring” bundle with weights, bag, and a massage tool for $59.99. Very good deal. I love the egg weights I have for running.

That’s all I have in the share-tabs. What are you into these days? I think I’ve got comments open on this post. If not, you can chat with me on Gab, MeWe, and SG, instead.

 

Some Food Discoveries

Happy food, sad food.

We had a birthday in the family last week, so I took the opportunity to enjoy a piece of my Cake Simulator, this time as a spice cake with peach butter cream frosting (recipes to follow shortly). I veered off my happy carnivore trail for a couple of reasons.

Firstly, I wanted to make sure it tastes good, because I haven’t had this version of the Simulation.

Secondly, I accidently bought another round of Nutrisense CGM monitoring, so I had a chance to make absolutely sure this cake doesn’t spike the glucose. I did it for you. I did it for science. I did it because I’m an idiot. Don’t forget to pause your subscription, guys. It auto-renews. Since I didn’t get to do any experimenting at all during the weeks I was intending to, due to an illness, I’m not terribly sorry I have another month to play around with my sugars, though I can’t say I feel good about the expense.

And thirdly, I wanted to see if the oxalate content of tiger-nut flour is enough to trigger my bladder problems. I hadn’t had any in a while, so I couldn’t remember if that was an effect I thought I’d observed or not.

Well, the results are in.

Taste: The thing you’re most concerned with, I’m sure, since that was what I was most concerned with, is how does it taste? I’m pleased to report that it was very, very tasty. A little bit of a bitterness in the mouth afterwards due to the stevia, but while eating it, it’s the best thing ever. Just don’t drink coffee with it, because it increases that aftertaste to a disgusting degree. I can’t understand how anybody “sweetens” coffee with stevia. Blech.

Glucose acceptability:

The farthest red dot to the left is the point at which I ate the cake. I’d been fasting until that point. You can see no spike from this, so I’m pretty confident in saying you can probably have at least one (1/16 of the cake) serving without losing your keto badge for the day. The little “spike” after it was exercise-induced. Your mileage may vary, of course. I’ve seen my glucose spike from “low-carb” foods that didn’t affect Get Along Husband in the slightest, so you want to do your own testing to be sure.

And thirdly, the oxalates. Because I have a lot of scar-tissue around my bladder after all the c-sections (I think this is why, anyway), foods high in oxalate cause me to have a hard time emptying my bladder, usually first thing in the morning. I can’t drink teas or eat spinach (like anybody would want to eat spinach anyway), and many other things cause these problems. And, sadly, tiger-nut flour must have enough oxalate to trigger this dysfunction for me. I was very uncomfortable when I woke up this morning, and took a few hours to finally be back to normal. If you have oxalate troubles, skip this food.

Better be laying in them beans and rice, ammiright? Besides the cake discovery, I’ve also found a very unexpected problem for my children. Over the last few years, I’ve heavily restricted grains and seeds from my children’s diets. We will very occasionally allow organic corn products. I believe grains are detrimental when taken with any regularity. But, because prepping has been on my mind, and rice is shelf-stable for a long time, I thought I’d try re-introducing some rice to my children’s diets, to see if they tolerate it. They enjoyed it, to be sure. Very tasty stuff.

But there was a detriment. Three times I gave them rice, each time a couple of weeks to a month apart. Three times, two of my smaller children got nosebleeds that same night. Nosebleeds? Rice?

So I guess we’ll be relying on some other starchy food for calories in the event we can’t get enough animal-based foods.

One final discovery that I’m sure you’ll be interested in:

Berries are keto food, right? And apple sauce is a no-no, right? Isn’t that what the gurus all say? Well, here you go:

There are a couple of things going on here that confounded this result that you ought to be aware of before you just write off blueberries forever and start eating apple sauce. First of all, obviously, apple sauce is not conducive to ketosis. But it is a 7 on the nutrisense scale, which is better than the blueberries’ 4. These were not particularly sweet blueberries, either. Some of them were still faintly green, and I didn’t enjoy them very much. I hadn’t fasted for very long before either of these tests, but I did throw some protein in with the apple sauce, and I’m sure that blunted the spike quite a bit. I’d have probably gotten closer to the blueberries’ score without the meat sticks. (I love Nick’s Sticks, btw. Not an affiliate link. Just wanted to share.)

The point is, blueberries might not be a great keto food after all. Of course, if you’re not primarily a fat-burner for the last several years, you’re likely going to have different results. Better or worse, I cannot say.

Again, test for yourself. You can get $25 off your first month by using my referral link. I’m not giving you any medical advice, ever. I’m just showing you what happens to a 5-year keto/carnivore when she does this stuff. I’ll have a bunch of exercise-related graphs to show you soon. I may even try a few more plant foods, but the longer I’m carnivore, the less I really care to even find out. I might not bother.

And now, I have a date with my butcher to pick up another whole beef. I can’t believe how much meat these children go through, and if there are going to be food shortages, rice is clearly not an option.

Can I feed this rice to the chickens? Will they explode?

Want to discuss? Meet me on MeWe, Gab, or SG.

 

 

Are You Ready? It’s Time!

I know you were expecting a Rapture, but you’re probably going to have to go through some stuff, American.

I was talking to a guy on Gab (follow me) yesterday, just in passing, and he was poo-pooing the idea that there could be food shortages in the U.S. It’s just fear porn, he says. This is the post where the exchange took place:

 

It’s hard for me to believe this level of denial exists. People are running out of infant formula, prices are going through the roof, and yet this guy thinks it’s fine. Yeah. It’s fine.

I know things have been very steady–downright luxurious, in fact–in the United States for the entire life of my generation. Even as a “poor” Appalachian girl, I always had enough, if not the finest, food to eat. If you’re a Boomer who was raised dirt-poor, the way my parents and in-laws were, you know that people can, in fact, get very hungry in this country, like any other. But it’s been a long, long time. Even my Boomer family can’t quite process the fact that we’re probably heading back into that level of poverty. Unfortunately, the hard times are coming, and we as a nation (if you can call this God-forsaken place a nation at this point) have earned them.

Get Along Husband and I haven’t been the most diligent of preppers, mostly because we have had to put most of our resources into the raising of our eight children. We’re not wealthy, and they eat a lot, you know. You would certainly want to look to some other blogger for advice on how to do all the prepping and homesteading kinds of things. But we do what we can to be smart about saving not just money, but food and supplies, for just in case things get tight. We didn’t run out of toilet paper during the great panic of 2020, for instance, so we passed that small test, anyway.

It’s about to get a lot harder than just a tp panic.

This nation has been cruising on borrowed, and often stolen, resources for a lot of years. We’re about to find out what life is like when you have to provide for yourself, instead of taking it from whomever you please just because you’re the bigger military or borrowing it from people who must know that you’ll never be able to pay it back.

I won’t rant on how we got here, though it is a temptation. I’ll just say this. Now’s the time. To do what? Well, first, you need to be repenting, America. Not just saying “Sorry I got caught.” (and oh, my, we are busted) but truly falling on your face and begging God to forgive us, and then accepting that there are going to be consequences for our national sins.

After that, if you haven’t already, you might want to lay in some extra non-perishable food, start raising some backyard chickens, put in a little  (or big, if you have the space) garden. Basically, start living like you can’t trust the system to provide, because you can’t. I know, a lot of us didn’t even know we were relying on the system. We thought we were doing things for ourselves. But look at egg prices. They’re slaughtering millions of chickens because of bird flu, prices are going up. Can you even get your own eggs?

It’s probably too late to materially prepare, but this might be a good quick-start guide for anybody who’s been sleeping until today. Honestly, you can only be so prepared for big disruptions. After the initial shock of SHTF, you have to be able to rely on your community to figure out how to proceed in the new conditions. So it’s our minds that really need to be prepared. Praying and fasting are in order.

As I said on SG (where you can also follow me, if you subscribe):

Christians, we are not promised an easy time of it. We are not promised a rapture (sorry) to make sure we never suffer a day in our cushy American lives. But we are promised that Jesus will never leave us or forsake us. As we go into whatever is coming next, I will thank Him for sorting out the wrongs that have been done, for bringing us to our knees so that we may repent as a nation.

Turn to Him. Trust Him. Praise Him.

He’s got our ultimate good, and His own glory in mind.

Want to talk about it? We can discuss on SG, Gab, or MeWe.

Friday Link-About

Happy Friday! I’m still feeling kind of rough, but I think I have some items of interest lying around here. Is the collapse of our society interesting? Is that the right word?

From a post I wrote in December 2020:

Masks separate us.

Possibly the worst thing they do is to leave a blank spot in the impressions our smallest children should be forming right now of interacting with other people, especially strangers. As we’ve learned from studying feral children there is a window of opportunity for children to learn certain things, and those formative years cannot be reclaimed. Who knows what social effects this unprecedented year-long mandate might have? Perhaps there will be no negative effect. I hope and pray that’s so. But would you want to be the guy that signed off on that experiment?

Human beings cannot live under this kind of stress without changing their relationships with one another. And they can’t do that without affecting their souls. 

I don’t believe it is just the IQ of these children that will suffer. I think we’re going to see a huge increase in anti-social behavior in this generation.

And another post I wrote last year:

One of the most painful memories I have of this faceless time was when we were sitting two taped-off rows behind a family with a little guy, maybe a year and a half old, and the sweet fellow couldn’t take his eyes off my face. It would be nice to think that he was staring so much because he’d never seen anybody so pretty, but my mirror tells a different story, so I can’t comfort myself with that explanation. My daughter noticed it, too, and asked me later why he was so interested in my face. “I think,” I said, “that it’s because mine is the only adult face he’s seen without a mask since he was too little to remember. He doesn’t know what to make of grownup strangers’ faces.” It’s a scary thought for our society’s future when you consider all the babies who went through that crucial phase of development without adequate exposure to community faces.

If my fool self could see the disaster coming way back then, then your fool selves should have been able to eventually, as well. Everyone who allowed their children to be around masked people, or who masked their own children to muffle their tiny voices is complicit in the hobbling of our entire next generation.

You. Are. Complicit.

Repent of your cowardice, and see that you don’t follow wicked “authority” so sheepishly ever again.

  • Alright, deep breath. Moving on. A friend from social media shared a couple of easy recipes yesterday, both of which I’m going to try soon:

Homemade Mead

Homemade Apple Cider

  • And while I’m linking, there’s also a Mother’s Day/Women’s gift box available from the same friend. It’s very high-quality stuff, at three price points. I have one of those adorable aprons. Click through to:

Love your wife/mother exorbitantly ($300)

Love your wife/mother extravagantly ($225)

Love your wife/mother enthusiastically ($100)

I suppose I should link to something about Ukraine and Russia, but you know, I’m just worn out with the propaganda. I’ll wait for the next thing, and just remind you that our government and media are packed with liars, and nothing–NOTHING–they tell you is true, or meant to guide you to the truth. Like the masks, you will bring nothing but harm to your family and your nation by falling in line with this narrative.

Anyhow, I’m going to start teaching some lessons now. I’ll try to be more uplifting next time. Have a happy Friday!

Mom Down!

No need to call for reinforcement.

I’m stuck in bed with a massive head-cold. I can’t hold my head up on my own, but I can still type, so let’s see what we can find to talk about today!

I had planned to take this day off from our usual homeschool co-op to do some extra academic work. After a week of administering superfluous state-mandated standardized tests, I really thought we needed the extra time for our own curriculum. Well, I’m sick, but that doesn’t mean we can’t a lot done, thankfully! Schooling when mom is sick, recovering from having a baby, or even just needing a rest from the grind, is, while still not as pleasant as just playing video games until you recover, very easy if you’ve laid a solid foundation of daily habits. While I’m nowhere near fully Charlotte Mason in my homeschooling approach, I have heartily adopted the CM philosophy on habit.

“Habit is ten natures.”

I get a lot of comments on how “good” my children are. By good, people mean that they are responsible, quiet, hard-working, self-correcting, and obedient. These things are all basically true, but my children are not innately any better than other children. What they are is trained, habituated, to do daily the things that go into being “good”. I don’t have to be present for them to continue their daily routines of chores, school work (though they do need some teaching), and self-care. They’ll start their independent work without me after the breakfast dishes are washed and the chickens and dog are taken care of. I’m still here to help in a lighter capacity than usual, but they’ll mostly figure it out on their own and help each other.

Get Along Husband and I were able to take an trip a couple of years ago for our 20th anniversary, leaving the children at home with their grandmother to keep them company. When we came home, she marveled at how little babysitting she’d actually had to do. It was like she was on vacation. They took care of her. She was basically just there so they’d have somebody to drive in case of emergency. And for fun. My goodness, she’s fun! They cooked the meals, cleaned up, did the household chores, took care of the smaller kids, did a little light school work, and she never had to lift a finger.

Am I bragging? A little bit, honestly, but not on myself. I’m absolutely delighted with my children! But I know that any group of kids that includes at least a couple of teenagers (my oldest boy was 15 at the time of our first trip) ought to be able to live quite comfortably without an adult for a week. Er, not that Nana isn’t an adult, but…well…you know what I mean.

I do feel like we’ve accomplished something, thanks to good teaching from the Bible, other godly parents, and early application of some of Charlotte Mason’s principles. Being able to come home to a smoothly running household with no drama, especially when you consider that the older ones were caring for small children down to the ages of two and three, is a very gratifying feeling.

It was as if we’d never left. Not even a little messy!

That wasn’t by accident or probably even good genetics. Though I’m told my husband was a wonderfully behaved, exquisitely polite child, I’m sure my wild hillbilly genes mitigate that somewhat. It has required a lot of hands-on training, and a lot of careful thought about what each child should be able to do for himself, and when. It’s not something I can really take a lot of personal credit for, though. I wish I could! I did put in the work, and I’m pleased that I was able to, but at the end of the day, I am an unprofitable servant. I’ve only done what all parents should be doing. And there are a lot of parents who are doing far better than I am. I’ve taken my example from them, and I congratulate them, also.

I look around and realize that there are a lot of parents who haven’t been blessed with either the Bible, good example, or such useful books as Laying Down the Rails, and their kids are absolutely lost every day without somebody telling them what to do every twenty seconds.

There are some commonalities I’ve noticed among these families that I think should be addressed. This post is starting to get a little bit too long, and I feel like a nap, so I’ll break the rest of my thoughts off for another day. My kids are delightful! I would love for every mom to be able to say that as whole-heartedly as I do, so I hope this post will turn into something useful, rather than the stream-of-consciousness exercise it set out to be.

Want to discuss? Send me a warm get-well-soon gif? Meet me on SG, MeWe, or Gab.

Using a CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor)

A geeky thing you can do for your health

I’ve been wearing a continuous glucose monitor from nutrisense.io for the last couple of weeks. I’m getting ready to switch it out for a fresh one today, and thought I’d share a link with you guys. For no good reason that I can discern, glucose monitors require a doctor’s prescription most of the time, but Nutrisense provides the service without bothering your own doctor or insurance. I believe there’s a doctor involved in there somewhere, but you pay out of pocket, and it’s considered to be for educational purposes only. Certainly you could share the information you gather with your own doctor, but I honestly have so little faith in the average doctor’s understanding of nutrition and metabolism that I don’t know why you’d want to. You’re often better off taking these matters into your own hands.

There’s really no world-changing reason for me to be using a CGM at this point. I just wanted a window to my metabolism that’s a little larger than the sporadic finger-prick glucose test can give.

A couple of years ago, when I had been doing carnivore for about a year, I got three months’ worth of monitoring from Nutrisense for both myself and Get Along Husband, mostly because I wanted to see if his chronic headaches could be correlated with blood sugar excursions, but also for my own entertainment. To some extent, the headaches were correlated with high glucose, and the CGM convinced him that a high-carb diet was never going to be beneficial to his tender noggin. His general health has benefitted from that information, as well.

There’s nothing like seeing your body struggling to deal with sugar in real time to make you knock that stuff right out!

Now, I have my hba1c and other lab tests, as well as my keto-mojo and the fact that I feel good all the time, to give me all the information I really need to decide whether my carnivore diet is working for me. So I didn’t exactly need a CGM this time around. But I wanted to see a few things after a couple more years of getting 99% of my nutrition from animal products:

  1. How high was my exercise raising my glucose? A couple of years ago, I would frequently see my sugars go up into the 160s after a hard workout or a run. How am I doing with that now? Does my body still need that much sugar, or am I running on fat more than I used to?
  2. Am I metabolically inflexible? What does a meal with carbs do to my body? While my overall numbers look great in a one-time lab test, there is that nagging question of what is happening on those rare occasions that I include berries or fruit or alcohol. Would I be able to go back to eating beans and rice fairly quickly (after all, the Great Reset is being foisted upon us as we speak) without too much metabolic trouble? Am I so physiologically used to running on fat that my body is distressed when I reintroduce sugar?
  3. It is often said by ketosis skeptics that metabolic flexibility goes out the window if you stay in ketosis too much, and that completely eliminating sugar is just as bad as having too much sugar. I doubt that inflexibility goes both ways. I think you can lose your ability to run on fat far more easily than you can lose your ability to run on sugar, but I wanted to see that happening, if it is. If I need to carb-cycle, I want to know that.

While these are things I thought I already knew the answer to because I’ve studied the dickens out of the subject, I really wanted to just see it. So far, I’ve had no real surprises, but I have a couple of weeks left to go in which I’ll probably put myself through some tests that I normally wouldn’t want to do. Hopefully I’ll be able to find the time to share the results with you.

This post is getting too long for a Monday morning, so I’ll be back with some graphs in another post to tell you what I’ve learned, and what I think I’m seeing. In the meantime, whether you eat a standard American diet, or paleo, or carnivore, or just live on air and sunshine like a plant, you might also be interested to see what’s happening to your blood glucose 24/7. If so, I have a referral link that will get you $25 dollars off your first order with Nutrisense. If you sign up, I would also get $25 off my next month, but I’m not going to be doing another month, so I don’t really benefit from this deal.

The cool thing about Nutrisense is that they have dieticians and coaches on hand to help you understand what you’re seeing. You don’t have to be a geek to get a lot of good information from this service.

Let me know if you decide to do it! Want to discuss this, or anything else? Find me any time on SG, Gab, or MeWe.

 

Carnivore Waffles and Keto Maple-flavored Syrup

You know, for kids!

As usual, recipe up front, babbling about it below:

Carnivore Waffles

100% Animal-based waffles
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Carnivore
Keyword: carnivore, keto, low carb
Servings: 8

Equipment

  • waffle maker
  • blender

Ingredients

  • 10 eggs
  • 1 lbs breakfast sausage Other ground meats could be substituted for different tastes/textures

Instructions

  • Blend eggs and sausage together until the mixture is a smooth batter.
  • Cook, 1/2 cup at a time, in a waffle maker on its highest setting.
  • Remove finished waffles to an oven on 200˚ F to keep warm until ready to serve.

Notes

This recipe easily doubles and triples to feed a crowd. 

Keto Maple-flavored Syrup

A low-carb syrup
Prep Time1 min
Cook Time5 mins
Course: Breakfast
Keyword: keto, low carb, sugar-free
Servings: 8

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 cups water
  • 2/3 cups erythritol/stevia granulated sweetener (I prefer the Pyure brand) or your preferred low-carb sweetener
  • 1 tbsp maple extract other extracts, such as vanilla, may be used as well
  • 1 pinch salt

Instructions

  • Whisk xanthan gum into 1/4 cup water and set aside.
  • Whisk sweetener and salt into 2 cups water in a small saucepan.
  • Heat syrup mixture until sweetener is dissolved, then remove from heat.
  • Whisk in maple or other flavorings and xanthan gum mixture.

Notes

This recipe doubles and triples easily to feed a crowd.

Somebody was asking me the other day (as they frequently do) what my kids are eating. I don’t hold them to a carnivore, or even a keto regime, but I’m not putting any more sugar in their lives than is good for them, either. We don’t want a blood sugar spike and drop to start our day off with a case of the grumpies. I give them their starches later in the day when their bodies are better able to use the sugars.

I make these waffles on special occasions, or just the odd laid-back Saturday. Carb addicts and strict carnivores will want to skip the syrup and just eat these waffles as a bread. I like to spread them with butter, or maybe add some diced ham to the batter for extra flavor and protein. It’s a really forgiving recipe to play with. Enjoy!